Monthly Archives

April 2015

Exploring Florida’s For-Profit College Industry

By | News

Miami Herald reporter Michael Vasquez has spent a year digging into Florida’s for-profit college industry for a series called Higher Ed Hustle.

About 300,000 Florida students attend a for-profit college, which often specialize in training low-skill workers for a new career.

But students often find their degree doesn’t qualify for the career they were seeking, and they graduate withe tens of thousands of dollars in debt.

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Are college admissions applications outdated and inefficient?

By | News

Most high-school seniors planning to enroll in college this fall already have made up their minds about where they are going. But for many others, this is the final week to make a choice: May 1 is Decision Day, when deposits are due to secure a spot in the next freshman class.

Picking a college is an emotional decision, and even after months or even years of courting each other, students and colleges many times make a bad match. One-third of students transfer between institutions at least once before they graduate, and half of students who enroll in college never get a degree at all.

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Gallup poll reveals truths about higher education

By | News

The significance of a higher education seems undeniable. Children are taught at a young age that attending college and getting a degree is crucial to getting a good job, which in turn leads to a good life or a higher quality of living. This is drilled into American students from k-3 to the end of high school, resulting in millions of students attending college each year hoping to achieve their elusive dreams.

A majority of people strongly agrees with this idea, according to the Lumina Foundation’s recent Gallup poll “Postsecondary Education Aspirations and Barriers.” Of those polled, 93 percent said they believed a college degree was necessary to find a good job, and 78 percent of the same individuals believed a good job meant a higher quality of life.

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Charted: More than ever, Americans need a college degree to get by

By | News

Even though employment and earnings have improved for many Americans in the last quarter century, they have worsened pretty dramatically for people with less education, according to a new analysis of changes in US census data between 1990 and 2013.

Men who don’t have a high school degree are earning 20% less than they were two decades ago, according to an analysis from the Hamilton Project (PDF), a group at the Brookings Institution, a Washington DC-based think tank focused on making economic growth more broadly based. (All the data in the report covers people in what are usually their prime earning years, 30-45.)

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Video: What Do Americans Without a College Degree Think About Postsecondary Education?

By | News, Video

Despite the nationwide call to arms for “college-for-all,” 60 percent of American adults today have not completed a postsecondary credential, and high college costs are widely cited as the primary culprit. Even still, many prospective students may not have a clear sense of the costs and potential benefits of postsecondary education because of information gaps or inaccurate beliefs.

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Report: Overall Persistence and Retention Rates Improve

By | News, Report

The overall persistence rate for students who entered college in fall 2013 was 1.0 percentage points higher than that of students who entered college in fall 2012, while the retention rate increased by 1.1 percentage points. The persistence rate is the percentage of students who return to college at any institution for their second year, while the retention rate is the percentage of students who return to the same institution for their second year.

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Q&A: President of Aspen Prize-Winning College Discusses Leadership

By | News

anta Fe College, in Gainesville, Florida, is the 2015 recipient of the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. Selected from among thousands of colleges, Santa Fe has a completion rate of 62 percent compared with the national average of 40 percent, and 70 percent of Santa Fe’s students are accepted at the University of Florida, in Gainesville. Since 2002, Jackson Sasser has been president of Santa Fe College. He attributes the college’s success to the faculty and the students and the “culture of excellence” that exists throughout the campus. In this 21stCentury Center interview, Sasser discusses some of the college’s successful programs and reflects on factors that have contributed to its achievements.

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Report: Expanding Access and Opportunity

By | News, Report

Agreat deal of effort across higher education has been devoted to increasing access and establishing the conditions for success by low-income and first-generation students. If American higher education is to achieve the nation’s aspirational goals for college completion, colleges and universities must enroll and graduate far more students from underserved backgrounds than they do today.

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Lumina Foundation breaks down college degree attainment in Florida — and the nation

By | News

Last year, the Lumina Foundation, partnered with some other education groups, launched a nationwide campaign to get the percent of Americans with a college degree to 60 percent before 2025.

Recently, the foundation released research that shows how each in state in the country is doing in that regard. For example, using 2013 Census data, the report says 39.6 percent of Californians held a college degree or college-type credential. In Texas, the percent was 35.4 and Florida had 38.6 percent.

The foundation’s report, which can be viewed here, even breaks the percentages down to the county level. Polk County’s percent in 2013 was 28.16 while neighboring Hillsborough County was 40.9 percent. Among the highest percentages in Florida was Leon at 54.81 percent and St. Johns at 51.7 percent.

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