Monthly Archives

October 2017

FSW Application Fees Waived Nov. 1-7

By | News, Press Releases

In order to minimize the financial burden of applying to college, prospective students can apply for admission to Florida SouthWestern State College (FSW) free-of-charge from Nov. 1-7.

The decision to waive admissions application fees for all new applicants was made in order to support the many individuals and families who were affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, as well as the devastating earthquakes in Mexico.

“The recovery could take years and in some communities the damage is irrevocable. Many families now have to rebuild their lives from scratch,” said Dr. Christy Gilfert, Assistant Vice President, Enrollment and Student Success. “We’re waiving the admissions application fee for these prospective students because earning a degree or obtaining new skills is a step many people can take to change their lives for the better.”

With 266 sunny days per year and 50 miles of white sand beaches, the Southwest Florida region continues to be a great place to visit, live, and study. With four convenient locations, affordable tuition rates, and various certificate and degree options, FSW is one of the fastest growing colleges in the state. New opportunities and activities for students also continue to expand each year.

The FSW Office of Admissions is available to answer questions about the College or application process at [email protected] or (239) 489-9054. An FSW Open House is scheduled for Nov. 15 from 3-5:30 p.m. on the Fort Myers campus. For more information, visit www.FSW.edu/admissions.

Florida SouthWestern State College is Southwest Florida’s largest and one of the most affordable institutions of higher education. Annually serving nearly 22,000 students globally, FSW offers a variety of nationally-ranked, career-focused academic programs with two- and four-year degrees, and professional certifications. Students are also active in clubs and programs catered to their interests. FSW debuted its intercollegiate athletics program in January 2016. Visit www.FSW.edu for more information.

UNMAZE.ME: Free Money: Pell Grants

By | News

In the state of Florida alone, over $100 MILLION is left behind every year in FREE college money! According to a recent survey by University of Florida (article here), Florida families leave behind money to help them pay for college simply by not filling out a simple form. Having access to the over $150 billion dollars worth of federal grants, loans, and work study opportunities simply comes from filling out FAFSA, or Free Application of Federal Student Aid.

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UNMAZE.ME: Full Tuition for Bright Futures: What Students & Parents Need to Know!

By | News

In the state of Florida, high achieving students have been rewarded with a state scholarship called Bright Futures. Funded by the Florida State Lottery since 1997, Bright Futures has been through several reiterations with its peak being in 2009 when it provided scholarships to 39% of Florida high school graduates. The program, since its inception, has solely been based on academic merit and not on financial need. However in 2011 with budget cuts throughout the state, Bright Futures scholarship tightened its requirements by increasing the standardized test scores and grade point average, which only allowed 20% of Florida high school graduates to meet the new requirements. Since then there has been discussion that the state funded scholarship does not go far enough in keeping Florida’s high achieving students in state or reduce the heavy burden of rising tuition costs.

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UNMAZE.ME: The Importance of Completing the FAFSA

By | News

The cost of sending a student to college is undeniably stunning for most families. Not only is there the cost of tuition, but you also have room and board, books and supplies, student activity fees, health insurance, lab fees, transportation and personal expenses. It goes without saying that, for most families, these expenses will cause a crimp in the monthly household cash flow.

Unfortunately, some students feel like they shouldn’t bother filling out a FAFSA because of some common myths. These include:

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UNMAZE.ME: Standing Out In Selective Admissions: The Application & Essay

By | News

ate summer greetings from your friendly University of Chicago alumni interviewer and college fair rep, Mr. Bill Parker.  I hope your summer has gone well.  As I write this, in most places across the land, school has started.  Here in Lee County, schools are open for business, and most colleges and universities are greeting incoming freshman and starting classes.  Except, maybe, at the U of C, which has long been a laggard in getting cranked up in the fall.  Having, since its founding, based its academic calendar on the quarter system (which it originated), fall classes at Chicago start late.  With high school having started, the number of campus visitors has slowed to a trickle, and most incoming freshmen will not show up until Move-In Day, September 18th.  Fall quarter classes won’t begin until September 26th.  In the intervening week, freshmen go through O-Week (orientation), during which they visit downtown icons like the Art Institute, attend a White Sox game, tentatively explore the University’s Hyde Park neighborhood and, perhaps, take in a little of downtown Chicago, learn about life in an urban setting, sit for mandatory and elective placement tests, receive academic counseling, register for fall classes, and attend the Aims of Education address.  Other selective colleges and universities host similar programs — though without the Aims address.   I’ve heard that the University’s late September start date follows either Oxford, which begins after Michaelmas (pronounced “Mikkle-m’ss”), or the Jewish High Holy Days — take your pick.  Meanwhile, during the month-long interval between the late August conclusion to the summer quarter and Move-In Day, a languid summer torpor descends on campus, almost as though the University were resting to build up strength for the year ahead.

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UNMAZE.ME: A Guide to Florida College Applications

By | News

As you begin the college application process, there are several key things you should know. Use this guide to help you navigate through the various applications you will find.

1. Institutional Applications- Institutional Applications are institutional specific, meaning the university uses their own application. Unfortunately, these can vary greatly from a quick 5 minute application to rather lengthy documents.

2. Common Application- Common App links to over 700 colleges throughout Florida and the United States. If several of your potential colleges use it,  it makes it easy and efficient by preparing one application for multiple universities. With most Common App schools there is an essay, and you have 1 of the 7 essay prompts you can do. Schools who use Common Application are traditionally “selective admissions”.  They often require teacher and counselor recommendation letters.

3. Coalition Application- The Coalition Application is similar to the Common App, where 113 schools use the same application. There are 5 essay prompts to chose from, and detailed information required about your course work, extra-curricular activities, and personal information.

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UNMAZE.ME: How to Ace College Admissions

By | News

As a college counselor and blogger, I guide hundreds of students and parents through the college admission process to minimize stress and maximize results. There are simple, yet highly effective, strategies all parents and students should do to successfully navigate the maze of college admissions. This simple process netted my students more than $10 million in scholarships.

1. Academic planning
High schools throughout Southwest Florida provide a wide array of college and career courses that can greatly benefit students when they enter college, from earning your associate of arts degree to employable industry certifications. It is important to know all options and opportunities available. Universities are looking for two things: 1.) a strong academic core of math, English, science, mathematics, social studies and foreign language, and 2.) a student’s passion for a particular subject or field of study. Avoid filler courses that do not fulfill either of those areas.

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UNMAZE.ME: 4 Ways to Utilize Your School Counselor

By | News

It is officially time to say goodbye to this year seniors, and start looking at the rising To begin your college process, there are multiple ways to ease the anxiety that comes with college admissions. One of the key ways is to know how to utilize your high school counselor efficiently and effectively.

  1. College Visits- this is the time of the year that many college admissions representatives are coming to individual high schools to speak with students about their college, programs, and what they offer overall. This is a great opportunity to start finding unique schools that may be a good “fit”. A suggestion is not to just go to schools that you know of or are thinking of applying to. I have had students go into a visit completely oblivious to the school, to walk away with multiple scholarships and deciding it was their perfect “fit” school. Also, by listening to what the admission representatives are saying, as a senior you will begin to understand the application process and key words to look for when looking at all schools. See the link College Terminology: Admission Process (http://www.unmaze.me/community/2016/6/30/college-terminology-3-admissions-process) for more of these words and definitions . Ask your counselor which schools are visiting and which ones would fit your interest areas.

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