Report: Expanding Access and Opportunity

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Agreat deal of effort across higher education has been devoted to increasing access and establishing the conditions for success by low-income and first-generation students. If American higher education is to achieve the nation’s aspirational goals for college completion, colleges and universities must enroll and graduate far more students from underserved backgrounds than they do today.

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Lumina Foundation breaks down college degree attainment in Florida — and the nation

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Last year, the Lumina Foundation, partnered with some other education groups, launched a nationwide campaign to get the percent of Americans with a college degree to 60 percent before 2025.

Recently, the foundation released research that shows how each in state in the country is doing in that regard. For example, using 2013 Census data, the report says 39.6 percent of Californians held a college degree or college-type credential. In Texas, the percent was 35.4 and Florida had 38.6 percent.

The foundation’s report, which can be viewed here, even breaks the percentages down to the county level. Polk County’s percent in 2013 was 28.16 while neighboring Hillsborough County was 40.9 percent. Among the highest percentages in Florida was Leon at 54.81 percent and St. Johns at 51.7 percent.

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Analysis: Higher Ed to Suffer as Medicaid Gains

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A “dismal outlook” is projected for state higher education funding in most states over the next decade due largely to a “crowding out” of discretionary funding by Medicaid, a new analysis shows.

The analysis — performed by Moody’s Analytics and titled “Crowded Out: The Outlook for State Higher Education Spending” — found that, nationwide, state Medicaid spending will increase as a share of overall state spending to 17.9 percent by fiscal 2024, up from 15.6 percent in fiscal 2013.

“In dollar terms, that equates to as much as $60 billion spent on Medicaid over the next decade that previously would have been available for discretionary items such as higher education,” the analysis states. “The bulk of these costs is incurred beyond 2020, when federal assistance falls to its lowest point.”

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University of Florida offers admission to 3,100, but with a catch: Freshman year is online only

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Like thousands of high school seniors across the state, Jesse Rascon nervously awaited a decision from the University of Florida, the state’s flagship school.

The answer left him perplexed.

“I opened up the notification on the website, and it didn’t say ‘Congratulations,’ but it also didn’t say, ‘We can’t offer you admission.’ So I was kind of like: ‘What is this?'” he said.

A senior in the International Baccalaureate program at John A. Ferguson High in Kendall, south of Miami, Jesse had just been offered admission to UF’s new Pathway to Campus Enrollment program.

Comments (47) April 21, 2015 For Those Without One, College Degrees Are Seen as Important but Too Expensive

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In the eyes of Americans without college degrees, higher education seems necessary but too expensive.

That is one of the main takeaways in a report released on Monday by the American Enterprise Institute, “High Costs, Uncertain Benefits: What Do Americans Without a College Degree Think About Postsecondary Education?”

The report was based on a survey of more than 1,500 people who lack college degrees about their perception of a college education. It echoed some of the findings of a public-opinion survey, released last week, of broader views of higher education.

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HIGH COSTS, UNCERTAIN BENEFITS What Do Americans Without a College Degree Think About Postsecondary Education?

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The path to economic mobility increasingly runs through postsecondary education. Although the combination of rising tuition prices and a difficult labor market have raised questions about the value of education after high school, degree and certificate holders are still better off than those with just a high school diploma.

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Report: Community College Completion: Progress Toward Goal of 50% Increase

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In April 2010, six national community college organizations (American Association of Community colleges, Association of Community College Trustees, National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development, League for Innovation in the Community College, Phi Theta Kappa, and Center for Community College Student Engagement) jointly signed an historic commitment to boost student completion by 50%. The participating organizations stated a bold goal for the community college field: “to produce 50 percent more students with high quality degrees and certificates by 2020, while increasing access and quality.” (See “Democracy’s Colleges Call to Action” in appendix A).
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Rich New Resource on Postsecondary Attainment

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A new federal report presents a wealth of data about how 2002’s 10th graders fared in higher education (and not) a decade later — potentially offering researchers and policy makers enormous insight into who attains postsecondary success and why.

The report offers a first look at new data from one of the U.S. Education Department’s most important longitudinal research studies, the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002, which followed 10th graders through to the 2012-13 academic year. Eighty-four percent of those high school sophomores went on to at least some postsecondary education within that decade, while 16 percent did not, with those variations differing, somewhat predictably, for certain demographic traits (women were more likely to go on than men, students from wealthier socioeconomic backgrounds were more likely than their peers, etc.).

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