A college degree is worth $1 million

By | News

College graduates earn $1 million more than high school graduates over their lifetime, and the income gap between the highest-paid college majors and the lowest-paid is more than $3 million dollars. This is all according to a study released Thursday by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The study analyzed wages for 137 college majors to discover the economic benefit of earning an advanced degree by undergraduate major.

“Not all bachelor’s degrees are created equal,” the report concluded. Among the 15 groups of college majors studied, architecture and engineering majors are paid the most and education majors are paid the least. Graduates with degrees in top-paying college majors earn $3.4 million more than those with the lowest-paying majors over a lifetime. Not surprisingly, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and health and business majors are the highest paid, leading to average annual wages of $37,000 or more at the entry level and an average of $65,000.

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Report: The Economic Value of College Majors

By | News, Report

Today, 35 percent of jobs require a Bachelor’s degree or higher. On average, these jobs pay $33,000 annually at the entry level and $61,000 at prime age. But averages are deceiving. The economic risks and returns to Bachelor’s degrees vary greatly among different majors. For today’s high school graduates, and an increasing share of middle-aged adults who are pursuing a Bachelor’s degree, the decision about what to major in will have critical economic consequences for the rest of their lives

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Why students are saying community colleges are the future of learning

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Almost 100 percent of community college students surveyed valued these institutions as an “important part of U.S. education system.”

This finding, which highlights the recent rise in community college popularity among U.S. student, is one of many within a new survey conducted by education company Cengage Learning.

The company recently release the findings at the 95th American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) Annual Convention, to present what it says is new student data revealing their perspectives on community colleges and how they fit into today’s educational landscape.

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Why are graduation rates at community colleges so low?

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The statistics from many community colleges are grim. Only about 39 percent of students who enter the country’s most accessible postsecondary institutions graduate within six years. A quarter of those who enroll in the fall don’t come back in the spring.

To boost the number of Americans with degrees, President Barack Obama has proposed making community colleges free.Tom Bailey, professor of economics and education and director of the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, supports the idea, but says it will have limited results if it’s not coupled with significant changes to the colleges themselves.

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Miami Dade Provides Leadership, Foundation For Community Colleges

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When the mayor of Miami learned that the German Consulate General in Miami wanted to gift a piece of the Berlin Wall to the city, he knew where it ought to go — right in a central plaza at Miami Dade College’s Wolfson Campus in Downtown Miami. Consulting with Miami Dade President Dr. Eduardo Padrón he found immediate and enthusiastic support for the proposal.

“It was given to me as the mayor of the city, and I said to Eduardo that I thought that the best place for this piece of the Wall should be at Miami Dade College, because the students will be able to remember history,” Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado says.

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Report: Educational Attainment: Understanding the Data

By | News, Report

Clear and reliable data are a prerequisite for defining meaningful goals for levels of postsecondary educational attainment and assessing progress toward those goals. Determining whether the number of Americans with college credentials is sufficient to meet the needs of the labor market, understanding gaps in attainment across demographic groups, and evaluating the success of people with different characteristics and in different circumstances in meeting their educational goals all depend on gathering and interpreting appropriate information.

Numerous data sources—most but not all from the federal government—provide valuable information on educational attainment. However, differences in the populations included, the methodologies for collecting the data, and the definitions underlying the categories reported frequently lead to inconsistent findings. This report synthesizes data from multiple sources, clarifies ambiguities, and uses the data to answer key questions about the levels of education among Americans. The questions addressed here are examples of the many that could be answered more accurately with easier access to and better understanding of the available data.

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Life lesson from grandmother graduating from MDC: ‘Learning is wonderful’

By | News

After years of studies, hard work and dedication, thousands of graduates will cross stages, receive diplomas and shake hands this month at colleges across South Florida.

While the majority of them will be young adults preparing to enter the job world or go on to graduate school, others are older, even senior citizens. Such is Rosa Salgado, who graduated Saturday from Miami Dade College’s Wolfson campus, fulfilling a lifelong dream and graduating with two of her grandchildren — David and Mauricio Salgado.

“My grandchildren, my family, they’ve grown up watching my activity and they are going to learn and fight in life and overcome obstacles,” said Salgado, who graduated with honors, earning an associate of arts in education. She is nearly 80.

Salgado received her diploma in one of five graduation ceremonies Miami Dade College held Saturday for its many campuses.

Attainment, Completion, and the Trouble in Measuring Them Both

By | News

Here’s a seemingly simple question: How have the educational-attainment rates of various groups of Americans changed over the years?

It’s a question with considerable impact. For example, the answer could help determine how well the country’s colleges and universities are meeting its labor needs, and how equitable education is across various demographic groups.

And the answer is? Well … that’s the hard part.

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Plotting Student Pathways

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It’s no accident that the competition for the prestigious Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence has been dominated by Florida colleges.

The very first prize, awarded in 2011, went to Valenica College, in Orlando. This year the prize was awarded to Santa Fe College, located in Gainesville.

And according to Rob Johnstone, president of the National Center for Inquiry & Improvement, 26 of the state’s 29 community colleges would have ranked among the top 100 colleges had not the Aspen jury — of which Johnstone was a member — tweaked the rules to create more balance.

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